Totally Not A Cult: Salon Writer’s First Thought On Building Collapse Was ‘Climate Change’

I was hoping to move on from the climate cult’s linking of the Sunrise building collapse with their cult beliefs, but, this one is too nutty to ignore

The Miami Building Collapse Is a Warning

When I saw Thursday morning that a condominium building had partially collapsed near Miami Beach, the first question I had wasn’t if anyone had died (that was second), but to wonder why the building had collapsed in the first place. Really, it was to wonder if a building collapsing in Miami would be investigated as a potentially climate change–related disaster.

That’s is pure, 100% unadulterated cult crazy. And climate cultists like Slate’s Susan Matthews (remember when Slate wasn’t moonbat nation?) aren’t even scare to admit, or even ashamed, that their first thought wasn’t about the people involved, but the climate crisis scam and how to link it to the disaster.

While authorities are understandably trying to frame Thursday’s collapse as a unique and freak accident, a few options have been raised about what possibly went wrong. Peter Dyga, president and CEO of a Florida chapter of the Associated Builders and Contractors, told the Miami Herald that investigators would be looking into numerous factors, including the building’s architectural plans, construction materials, and maintenance records. “This is going to be probably multiple years in trying to figure out what happened here. There are so many variables,” he told the Herald. “It’s probably more than likely going to be a combination of bad things.” Burkett told a local TV news station that “he couldn’t imagine any reason for the tragedy other than if a sinkhole occurred or someone pulled the supports out of the building.” The vice president of a construction company explained to another local news station why Florida is a particularly difficult place to build—if steel gets exposed to salt or chlorides, it can corrode; if soil subsides, it can affect the foundation and overall structure of a building.

It was built on a barrier island on a soft, sandy, limestone base. It’s been there for 40 years exposed to salty ocean water, through tropical systems and thunderstorms, and was apparently ill-maintained. But, you know

climate change joke

Pretty soon, however, news stories started to assess possible connections between climate change and the collapse. The Washington Post reports that “experts on sea level rise and climate change caution that it is too soon to speculate if rising seas helped destabilize the oceanfront condo,” and then goes on to explain all of the things we already do know that feel quite relevant: Miami is particularly vulnerable to sea-level rise—some estimates in Miami suggest it’s seen a foot of rise in the past century, half of that coming since the 1990s—and sea-level rise in limestone is a particularly worrisome combination (because the water goes through instead of being held back, which can exacerbate corrosion). The Palm Beach Post sorts through the same issues, with various experts weighing in from various directions about the most likely culprits. Some think sea level rise and its corrosive effects might have played a role, others are more inclined to suggest it was the crane on the roof that might have been a bigger factor. The experts largely dismiss sinkholes as a possible cause because they’re less prevalent in the immediate area, though for what it’s worth, a paper published in the Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences in 2018 looked specifically at climate change’s effect on sinkholes in Florida and concluded that “for every 0.1°C rise in global temperature, the number of sinkholes increases by 1%–3%.”

But, of course the climate cultists went right to Hotcoldwetdry. Like, immediately. Trotting out pieces designed to prop up their cult and scaremonger.

Ultimately, what upsets me most about the collapse is the immediate death, the count of which is sure to grow. But I also am disturbed that my brain wrapped around this horrific event by jumping a few steps further into the future, into a world where building collapses are just another thing that journalists cautiously acknowledge as catastrophes that might be exacerbated by climate change, but we end up just dealing with them, just like we have learned to deal with the heat waves and the fires and the droughts and the hurricanes. The water is already boiling. We’re just getting more accustomed to treating the burns.

BS all around. Susan admitted the first thing she cared about was ‘climate change’, not people hurt and killed. Because this is a cult. And there were plenty more unhinged pieces I scrolled through while searching climate change over the last 24 hours.

Save $10 on purchases of $49.99 & up on our Fruit Bouquets at 1800flowers.com. Promo Code: FRUIT49
If you liked my post, feel free to subscribe to my rss feeds.

Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed

8 Responses to “Totally Not A Cult: Salon Writer’s First Thought On Building Collapse Was ‘Climate Change’”

  1. Hairy says:

    Yeah Teach the collapse had nothing to do with rising temps or sea level
    Those things should not be considered

  2. CC says:

    So is all the other OLD infrastructure that’s crumbling all over the world attributable to AGW – no doubt you climate cultists believe everything you’re told.
    Ignorant people are always the target of manipulative people.

  3. MrToad says:

    Plaintiffs and their lawyers won’t accept “It was Climate Change!” when they’re in court. “It was Climate Change!” doesn’t pay legal fees or settlements.

    “Climate change” won’t be the cause and an individual and/or and organization will be found responsible and on the hook for those US cash dollar payments. “Climate Change” doesn’t have any money, lawyers don’t work for free and the State of Florida is not in a “let’s blame climate change and give blank checks to activists” frame of mind.

    In the end it will be blamed on an unmaintained 40-year old skyscraper built on a sand bar. It could be worse. How will the Millennium Tower folks explain that their building was built on top of a sinking landfill when it collapses? It’s already sunk by 18 inches and The Millennium Tower is 58 floors in Central San Francisco, not a 12-story residential building on a Florida beach.

  4. CC says:

    So the interwebs have gone from being populated by epidemic experts, then legal experts, and now structural engineer experts.
    So many experts, so much stupidity.
    AGW is caused by the exhalations of liberal morons; prove me wrong.

  5. Dana says:

    As (probably) the only commenter here who has actual concrete construction experience here, as in thirty professional years of it, I can tell you what happened. In a salt air environment, ordinary rebar was used, not the epoxy coated rebar used in bridges today. Non-chloride water reducers for concrete existed in 1981, but they were both more expensive and less efficient than chloride based water reducers; did the concrete plant use the wrong material to save money?

    Where was the aggregate for the concrete stored? In the salt heavy air on the humid Florida coast, salts can settle on sand and stone piles, adding chlorides to the mix.

    During the concrete pours, was excess water added to the mix; contractors and pump operators love higher slumps (wetter mixes), and pumping up twelve stories will push pump operators to ask for more water.

    How old was the concrete when placed? A slight backup, and you can have trucks sitting on the jobsite for an hour. The loads get ‘retempered,’ meaning more water added, before the trucks start to unload.

    I’ve seen almost every trick in the very much unpublished book that gets used on construction sites, and almost all of them decrease the quality of concrete.

    • david7134 says:

      Thanks for the info. I was looking at the pictures of the remains and got the feeling the construction was not above board.

  6. Sua Sponte says:

    Kinda surprised they also didn’t wrap “white rage” or “white privilege” into this…

  7. Jl says:

    Well, we know for sure it was caused by either “climate change” or racism……

Bad Behavior has blocked 10573 access attempts in the last 7 days.