Climate Change Adding Billions To Non-existent US Hurricane Costs Or Something

Remember that hurricane that made landfall in the U.S. just the other week? Oh, wait, the United States has only been hit with one actual hurricane since 2008, and that one, Issac, could be argued was actually just a tropical storm. We’re three days away from the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Wilma, which was the last time the US was hit with a major hurricane, the longest period of no major landfalling hurricanes since the Civil War. But, hey, things are supposedly really, really bad, according to Doyal Rice

(USA Today) The cost of U.S. hurricane damage has increased dramatically from 1900 to 2005 as a result of man-made climate change, an economic study released Monday concludes.

“The rise in losses is consistent with an influence of global warming on the number and intensity of hurricanes, an influence which may have accounted for 2% to 12% of the U.S. hurricane losses in 2005,” according to the study, which was published in the peer-reviewed British journal Nature Geoscience.

In 2005 alone, climate change was likely responsible for close to $14 billion of additional damage, including devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina.

Huh. The study avoids any mention of the last 10 seasons. I wonder why?

The study claims that the extra costs in recent decades do not just stem from more homes, businesses and infrastructure that have been built near the coastlines. “Increases in wealth and population alone cannot account for the observed trend in hurricane losses,” according to the study, whose lead author is Francisco Estrada, an economist at Mexico’s National Autonomous University.

Estrada and two colleagues from Europe said that this unexplained increase in economic losses over time is consistent with a climate change signal.

So, since there has been so few landfalling hurricanes and tropical storms since the start of the 2006 season, and they have almost dried up since 2008, does that mean there’s no “climate change signal” now? Some of the worst hurricane years occurred during….wait for it….Modern Warm Period pauses. The mid-1940’s through mid-1970’s was a big period, especially in the 1960’s. What of the great Galveston hurricane of 1900? Wasn’t much time for “climate change” to kick in, and it was when CO2 was well below the “safe” level of 350ppm.

University of Colorado’s Roger Pielke, who was not involved in the study, said it should have included hurricane damage data from just the past 10 years (2006-2015), which have been quiet for hurricane activity. He said it’s “misleading” to end an analysis with the “exceptional” hurricane year of 2005.

“The period 2006-2015 has been well below average in terms of damage and U.S. hurricanes,” Pielke said in an email to USA TODAY. “It is shocking that they did not include this further data.”

No, it’s not shocking, it’s what the Cult of Climastrology does. They claim that it is cherry picking to work backwards from today to show how long the Pause has been going on. Will they say it is cherry picking to ignore data from 2006-2015? Of course not, the idea here is to create a Scary Fable, for which we have to Do Something, namely, increase taxation and control of citizens, private entities, and economies.

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6 Responses to “Climate Change Adding Billions To Non-existent US Hurricane Costs Or Something”

  1. John says:

    Teach it is pretty obvious that you do only consider hurricanes important when they cause damage to the USA and to rich white people that live along the coast
    There has been an increase in the number and intensity of hurricanes, but they have been hitting more often poor darker skinned people in the Carrivesn and Mexico
    This is probably due to the polar vortex being forced south by the rapidly warming Arctic and its high pressure

  2. drowningpuppies says:

    There has been an increase in the number and intensity of hurricanes…

    Sorry johnny, even your go-to site SkS says you are retarded or a liar.

  3. Dana says:

    No mention is made of costs after 2005, because that would invalidate the argument.

    Let’s say we use a ten year average, 2005 through 2014 (since the data for 2015 are incomplete, the hurricane season not being over), and what we’d wind up with is very low average costs, due to one very bad year, plus 2012, when tropical storm Sandy cause a lot of damage, and eight fairly decent years.

  4. Dana says:

    John wrote:

    Teach it is pretty obvious that you do only consider hurricanes important when they cause damage to the USA and to rich white people that live along the coast. There has been an increase in the number and intensity of hurricanes, but they have been hitting more often poor darker skinned people in the Carrivesn and Mexico

    Not sure where the Carrivesn is, but, as an American, it would seem to me that this is a good thing: I am far more concerned about Americans than I am about Mexicans or Carrivesnians.

    It’s pretty obvious: we need more global warming, to keep those hurricanes hitting Mexico and the Carrivesn instead of the United States!

  5. Dana says:

    John wrote:

    Teach it is pretty obvious that you do only consider hurricanes important when they cause damage to the USA and to rich white people that live along the coast. There has been an increase in the number and intensity of hurricanes, but they have been hitting more often poor darker skinned people in the Carrivesn and Mexico

    If the darker skinned Carrivesnians and Mexicans are poorer, then whatever damage is suffered by them in a hurricane would not only be less expensive to replace, but the replacement would stimulate the Mexican and Carrivesnian economies, right? This is a win-win!

  6. John, the article and study are based solely on US costs. Please read prior to commenting, lest you look foolish.

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