Should The Government Regulate Your Grow In The Dark Plant?

That’s the headline on the front page of the Washington Post, slightly different at the story page

Hunkered down in a converted shipping container stationed in a San Francisco parking lot, three young entrepreneurs are tinkering with the DNA of ordinary plants in the hopes of being able to mass produce a variety that glows in the dark.

If all goes well, their start-up company will begin mailing out the first batch of seeds next spring to the 8,000 donors across the country who helped them raise nearly $500,000 in a phenomenally successful online fundraising campaign through Kickstarter.

It’s a big “if”, because enviro-hysterics and are creating issues, from Kickstarter funding because the plants are genetically modified (stuff like that never ever happened before, ya know!) to whining at government agencies to Do Something

“What if someone decides it would be cute to light up a national forest?” asked Arthur Caplan, a bioethicist at New York University and an adviser to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency on synthetic biology.

Well, then, civilization might end or the planet might explode.

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2 Responses to “Should The Government Regulate Your Grow In The Dark Plant?”

  1. […] at Pirate’s Cove is blogging about “Should The Government Regulate Your Grow In The Dark […]

  2. Ignore_My_Cold_Gumballs says:

    What if someone decides it would be cute to light up a national forest?

    Yes, because there are absolutely no lights whatsoever in any forest anywhere. And, we know that there are no campfires either. Or natural forest fires. Or lightning bugs.

    I don’t hear anyone complaining about the GMO food we’ve been eating for over 150 years. Esp now that we can feed many more people per acre with less water, less chemicals and less work.

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