Who Had “Sleep Is Now Racist” On Their Bingo Card?

Brought to you by the Barking Moonbats at Teen Vogue, a magazine meant to be about “Fashion, Beauty, Entertainment News For Teens.” No, really, search for Teen Vogue, see what the link title looks like. And there are some silly celeb stuff, till we get to things like ending landlords, because housing should be a human right and being time to end white politics (who wants to bet that the majority of readers are white teens?). Oh, and underwear for those who don’t like doing laundry (for teens, doesn’t mom do the laundry? Most teens aren’t living off on their own)

From the insanity

Fannie Sosa and Navild Acosta were tired, but it wasn’t just any old fatigue. Yes, they experienced a lack of sleep, but they were specifically experiencing a generational fatigue familiar to Black people and people of color. From this sleeplessness, the two created Black Power Naps.

“It came from understanding that the American dream is a sleepless one,” Sosa said. “ We inherited this exhaustion.”

Black Power Naps is an artistic initiative with components including physical installations, zines, an opera, and more. But it’s also a recognition of the hundreds of years of sleep deprivation that Black people and people of color have experienced as a result of systemic racism, a way to pushback against the false stereotype that Black people are lazy, and an investigation of the inequitable distribution of rest. That lack of sleep has serious consequences. (snip)

Studies have shown that, for a host of reasons, Black people get less sleep, and less deep sleep, than white people. Sleep loss can cause higher levels of cortisol, as Acosta noted, and can lead to many health problems including early death. But there’s something deeper going on — Acosta explained that sleep deprivation was used as a means of control over enslaved people, meaning Black people haven’t been getting the sleep they need for generations.

“We’re dealing with an inheritance of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was a…deliberate tactic of slave owners to basically make the mind feeble,” he said. “That same tactic has only evolved.”

One of the reason is (supposedly) due to crappy conditions in Democratic Party run inner cities where Democrats send Blacks to in the form of “public housing”, which has lots of noise and cigarette smoke and crime. Though they forget to mention the Democrats. Regardless, doesn’t matter, this is your fault for sleeping just a little bit longer because you’re white.

“We’re dealing with an inheritance of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was a…deliberate tactic of slave owners to basically make the mind feeble,” he said. “That same tactic has only evolved.”

Who’s depriving them now? They never say.

To help resolve this chronic lack of sleep, Acosta and Sosa are calling for rest as reparations. Yes, they’re looking for an ease to the many burdens that might prevent Black people and people of color from sleeping like systemic racismsocioeconomic struggle, and more. But they’re also looking for the opportunity to rest and have leisure time — time that will allow people to dream and heal.

Sounds like people are just angling for constant paid time off.

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6 Responses to “Who Had “Sleep Is Now Racist” On Their Bingo Card?”

  1. Dana says:

    Ahhh! The windows open at night, the sound of rain on the metal roof, and crickets and other critters of the night — somewhere around here, a bull toad lives — yeah, that’s how this country boy likes to sleep.

    In our previous house, in a small town in northeast Pennsylvania, the porch had a metal roof, and the porch roof was right underneath our bedroom window. Same effect during a rainy night, but, alas! there was the occasional neighborhood noise and passing of automobiles as well. Not quite like the country.

    I’ve got to admit it: I love having my White Privilege™ getting me out of towns and cities to the peaceful countryside.

    What’s that you say? I’ve mentioned that my farm in eastern Kentucky only cost $75,000? You mean, that’s affordable housing even for Negroes? Well, yeah, I guess that it is, but you know what? According to the statistics, only 0.12% of my eastern Kentucky county’s population is black, in this very affordable area, so I’m guessing that black families are not choosing to live here.

    • Elwood P. Dowd says:

      How’s the job market there? Can you support your family selling your farm goods?

      • formwiz says:

        How’s your job market?

        Jobless claims still declined, moron.

        So we’re still winning and you’re still losing.

        • Elwood P. Dowd says:

          Mr. Dana suggested that Black Americans move to rural Kentucky as he did, and since they’re aren’t many Black Americans there that they choose to not move there.

          The typical Black American family hasn’t the resources that a typical white retiree enjoys, e.g., proceeds from a home sale, for reasons that have been repeatedly explained. Are jobs available if the family needed income from work?

          Does Mr. Dana work there? Does Mr. Dana support his family by growing their own food? What works for Mr. Dana may not work for everyone.

          • formwiz says:

            Mr. Dana suggested that Black Americans move to rural Kentucky as he did, and since they’re aren’t many Black Americans there that they choose to not move there.

            The typical Black American family hasn’t the resources that a typical white retiree enjoys, e.g., proceeds from a home sale, for reasons that have been repeatedly explained. Are jobs available if the family needed income from work?

            Reasons like a pack of Leftist animals burned down their home?

            And jobs are available everywhere. All you have to do is look.

            Does Mr. Dana work there? Does Mr. Dana support his family by growing their own food? What works for Mr. Dana may not work for everyone.

            Only if you want to go on welfare.

          • Dana says:

            Mr Dowd took assumptions that are not valid:

            The typical Black American family hasn’t the resources that a typical white retiree enjoys, e.g., proceeds from a home sale, for reasons that have been repeatedly explained. Are jobs available if the family needed income from work?

            While I am retired, many people in my mostly rural county are not. They have jobs, so jobs must exist.

            As for “proceeds from a home sale,” we bought our farm here out of savings, not he proceeds from selling our previous house. We bought the farm in September of 2014, as our planned retirement home, and then rented it out for three years before moving down and putting our Pennsylvania home up for sale.

            Does Mr. Dana work there? Does Mr. Dana support his family by growing their own food? What works for Mr. Dana may not work for everyone.

            Though I am white, there are many black and Hispanic people who worked in the ready-mixed concrete industry. In my experience, most ready-mix companies are majority black. So, yes, there was just as much opportunity for black or Hispanic Americans to do the jobs I did.

            My wife, who is also white, is a registered nurse. How’d she become an RN? She went to Thomas Nelson Community College in Hampton, Virginia, and obtained her Associate in Applied Sciences degree, and then sat for her license examination. Most community colleges will accept all applicants who have a valid high school diploma, and financial aid exists.

            This is where Mr Dowd is wrong: what worked for my wife and I can work for anyone who isn’t physically or mentally handicapped. All that they have to do is do it.

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