Why A Wall Is Needed: Illegals Attempting To Cross In Remote Areas

Not all migrants show up at or near typical border crossings to Demand asylum (which most do not qualify for and do not receive). Many are straight out illegal aliens, as they cross in very remote areas. They’ve always done this, but there is a change going on recently with the caravan folks

Migrant families shift to dangerous desert crossings

Increasing numbers of Guatemalan families trying to enter the U.S. illegally are avoiding the most popular routes in favor of more dangerous, remote desert crossings like those used by the two children who died this month in Border Patrol custody, officials said Monday.

Most people trying to sneak into the country still use long-established routes in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley. But recently released government figures show a growing number of families crossing along the 268-mile stretch of border known as the El Paso Sector, which includes western Texas and all of New Mexico.

In November, the U.S. Border Patrol in that sector caught 11,617 people traveling in families — nearly 20 times the total during November 2017 and just over a fifth of all migrants apprehended on the southern border. The majority of those families were from Guatemala.

Kevin McAleenan, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection commissioner, told reporters Monday that the increase in migrant families was creating an “unprecedented crisis.”

From Dec. 22 to Dec. 30 along the entire border with Mexico, the Border Patrol has referred 451 migrants — including 259 children, about half of them under age 5 — to medical providers.

“Many were ill before they departed their homes,” McAleenan said, citing cases of flu, pneumonia, tuberculosis and parasites.

Notice in that first paragraph: the parents brought the young kids across a dangerous area. The parents are putting not just themselves, but also their children, in high danger. And you can place much of the blame on members of the Democratic Party, who entice people to make the trek and make the dangerous crossing into the United States, promising all sorts of things if they just make it here. Democrats also make it harder to deport illegals, all while knowing that once released it will be much harder to find them again.

Democrats bear responsibility for any deaths that occur, and for when these illegals spread disease to Americans.

Hence, why we need a wall in remote areas. Do we want a wall, even a “beautiful” one? No. But the people sneaking into our nation and the pro-invasion Democrats have made it a necessity. Will it stop everyone? No. But, until such time comes that Democrats stop protecting illegals and agree to straight up deportation for all here illegally, it is necessary.

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4 Responses to “Why A Wall Is Needed: Illegals Attempting To Cross In Remote Areas”

  1. Dana says:

    If more of the illegals are driven to try the more dangerous areas, then more of them will perish in the attempt. As more of them perish, more will get et by scavengers and other wildlife, so some of their remains will be converted into methane-rich animal farts, which will increase greenhouse gas emissions, and we’ll all die.

  2. Jethro says:

    If “The Wall” is really the most important issue related to US security, integrity and nationhood, Mr. “Let’s Make a Deal” should be able to get it done tomorrow, no problem. Even without Mexico paying for it.

    In the meantime 400,000 federal workers aren’t getting paychecks and their rent due, from the Trump Shutdown.

    Trump:

    “I am proud to shut down the government for border security … I will be the one to shut [the government] down. I’m not going to blame you for it … I will take the mantle. I will be the one to shut it down.”

    The US Office of Personnel Management recommended that furloughed employees send letters like this to their creditors:

    “I am a Federal employee who has recently been furloughed due to a lack of funding of my agency. Because of this, my income has been severely cut and I am unable to pay the entire cost of my mortgage, along with my other expenses.”

    At a time the economy is doing well…

    • formwiz says:

      Nice to see Jeffery admits the economy is booming. We’ll keep that in mind.

      400,000 federal workers aren’t getting paychecks and their rent due

      They and their creditors know they will be reimbursed the second this is over.

      And Trump is making a deal. This is the part where you have to be willing to get up and walk away from the table.

    • Dana says:

      Given how overpaid — Federal civilian workers with no more than a high school education earned 34% more, on average, than similar workers in the private sector — federal workers are, any federal worker who sends a letter saying “I am a Federal employee who has recently been furloughed due to a lack of funding of my agency. Because of this, my income has been severely cut and I am unable to pay the entire cost of my mortgage, along with my other expenses” should be immediately fired, because he is such a piss-poor money manager. Do we really want overpaid federal workers who are so poor with money that they are one missed paycheck away from eviction or foreclosure working for us?

      The same CBO website indicates that, other than holders of doctoral or professional degrees, federal workers are more highly paid than civilian workers at every educational level.

      The term limits idea was a good one, but a better one would be on federal employees: no one may work for the federal government for more than twelve years.

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