The Death Of B.B. King Means We Should Totally Remember Our Original Sin Or Something

In case you missed it, B.B. King, one of the best of the original Blues players ever, passed on. Of course, when we walk down the road into the fever swamps of Leftism, in this case, the always unhinged and insane Salon, we get

B.B. King and our blatant racial revisionism: The South still denies the roots of “America’s music”
Southern states celebrating “America’s music” should remember the direct line between our original sin & the blues

We all have to go sometime. And hopefully, B. B. King was able to reflect in his twilight years that he had lived a longer, greater and more illustrious life than he ever might have imagined when he was born in the cotton fields of the Mississippi Delta back in 1925. He has passed away at the grand old age of 89.

I have found myself listening extensively to the blues over this past year or so. There is not a direct musical connection here to my biography of Wilson Pickett, who went straight from gospel to R&B and soul. But it has helped further inform my understanding of the culture of the deep South, the music that came out of the slavery experience, and how it then traveled, via the Great Migration, to the big cities of the industrial North. Just recently, I found myself listening to B.B. King’s classic “Why I Sing the Blues” and had to stop what I was doing to truly register the opening verse:

When I first got the blues
They brought me over on a ship
Men were standing over me
And a lot more with a whip
And everybody wanna know
Why I sing the blues…

I thought back to when I drove briefly through Mississippi this March and was taken aback by its disingenuous welcome sign, “Birthplace of America’s Music,” which offers absolutely no hint whatsoever as to how that music came about. A much more simple and accurate statement would be to call it “Birthplace of the Blues,” and leave travelers and residents alike to draw their own reference points.

Unfortunately, such revisionism is everywhere in America, and probably the world. I’m currently reading the brand new book “Country Soul: Making Music and Making Race in the American South“ by Charles L. Hughes, which takes a fresh look at the famously “integrated” studios of Memphis, Muscle Shoals and Nashville, and the mostly white musicians who played on (and produced, and owned) so much of the great soul music that came out of them. The story of how black music from the South was steadily assimilated into and by white popular culture is, thanks to the work of people like Hughes, one of ongoing debate – and “Country Soul” confirms how our own skin color, however subconsciously and perhaps even unwillingly, plays into our individual perspectives on the issue(s).

Is anyone surprised by Salon writer Tony Fletcher using the death of Mr. King as an excuse to delve into slavery, a practice that has been outlawed in the United States for over 150 years, and racism? These folks cannot help themselves when it comes to stoking the flames, rather than looking for healing. Seriously, a sign set Tony off. A sign. Blues is America’s music. It was developed here. But, loony tunes liberals always have to assuage their white guilt and push this narrative. They can’t help themselves.

And, apparently, because White people like the Blues, we’re unconscious racists. Seriously, even after all this time, I really do not get in the slightest how Liberal brains work. The insane thoughts that emanate are really insane.

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3 Responses to “The Death Of B.B. King Means We Should Totally Remember Our Original Sin Or Something”

  1. Jeffery says:

    Is anyone surprised by Salon writer Tony Fletcher using the death of Mr. King as an excuse to delve into slavery, a practice that has been outlawed in the United States for over 150 years, and racism?

    Why can’t the Negro just get over this whole slavery thing? The Jew got over the Holocaust. The Southern man got over the Civil War. So why can’t the Negro just appreciate the good world we let them live in here in Amuricah? We let them vote between 1965 and 2013, but they elected a Negro president when there were just as qualified white men available. Now all we ask is that they not steal elections and they get all uppity. We ask them not to run when a cop points a gun at them and then they get all uppity when the cop shoots them.

  2. drowningpuppies says:

    Hey, just blame whitey for everything.
    Oh wait, you already do.

  3. john says:

    That’s right Teach there hasn’t been a mass lynching in ‘Merica since 1946 when 2 men and 2 women were brutally murdered ( of course no one was ever arrested or convicted)
    And of course Teach and DP you both should be allowed to be the ones that define what raaaacism means in our country

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