Greenpeace Warmist: Hey, All You Warmists Shouldn’t Feel Guilty About Being Complete Hypocrites

Over the years I and other Climate Realists have consistently pointed out that Warmists rarely practice what they preach, and, at best, only take token measures within their own lives, such as replacing a bulb or two with CFLs. When you read my posts on “climate change” or comments around the web that theme will be included more often than not. Warmists are often very upset with me for calling out their blatant hypocrisy. Fortunately, James Turner, the head of communications for Greenpeace International’s Save the Arctic Campaign, is here to say “don’t feel guilty”

The climate change guilt trip

A friend recently returned from a camping trip in the Sierra Nevada. His eyes shone as he described the opalescent sky, the vitality of wildlife in spring and the fun he’d had playing with his two young daughters during the mellow evenings. It had been a really good trip, an experience to treasure, he said.

I casually asked how long it took to get there. “Oh, it wasn’t too bad,” he said, and then caught himself, as if he’d said something wrong. “But we took the minivan this time, which I suppose means we weren’t so in tune with nature after all.”

I felt slightly hurt. I am an environmentalist — I work for Greenpeace. Did he think that makes me some moral arbiter of fun, sternly passing judgment on those who ignore the perils of climate change to enjoy a weekend in the mountains?

Of course, it wasn’t really about me. What my friend expressed was climate guilt, a feeling that many of us who care about environmental issues experience every day. I am not immune. We feel guilty about driving cars and watching TV and turning on lights, as if that makes us personally responsible for this gigantic threat that looms over us.

But, you know who’s at fault for making Warmists feel guilty for being hypocrites?

Whether this “guilt barrier” is deliberately constructed or just innate to our psyches, it’s being exploited by the fossil fuel cartel. Its members are content to have us feel guilty, particularly if it contributes to a sense of helplessness. Where once companies such as Exxon Mobil denied that their products were causing dangerous levels of pollution, now they claim it is impossible to switch from them. “Look at your life,” this thinking goes. “You’re up to your neck in it. You really want us to turn off the tap?”

See? It’s the fault of Big Oil for pointing out that Warmists are hypocrites (hey, remember the 2005 UN IPCC in the exotic vacation spot of Bali, where so many private jets brought that they had to deadhead (fly without passengers) them to other islands to park them?), apparently hurting Warmist feelings and making them feel bad.

This accusation is based on a false premise: that all alternatives are equally accessible to consumers, and we’re all happily choosing fossil fuels. That’s simply not true, and nowhere is this more evident than in the case of the oil industry’s greatest threat: the electric car.

Despite encouraging news that the Toyota Prius has become the No. 1 selling car in California, fully electric vehicles remain out of financial reach for all but the most affluent families. And like most of America, our state lacks the charging infrastructure to support many such cars anyway. More barriers to entry.

Hey, you could ride a bike. Live close to work. Walk. Take the bus. If you really believe that fossil fuels are evil, you’d find a way.

Whatever my friend might personally think about climate change and air pollution, he has to stick to a budget that will support his whole family. Nor will he risk stranding them all along I-5. His “choice” of a minivan is in fact no choice at all. He’s left feeling disempowered, implicated and hypocritical. Any desire to act is supplanted by resignation. But whose fault is it?

Well, if he really believes, he wouldn’t take that fossil fueled trip in the first place. He could, at least, purchase a small, fuel efficient car, or even take the bus. And, yeah, Mr. Turner continues to blame Big Oil in the next paragraph.

Maybe it’s time for us to remove the guilt. Yes, I drive a car that runs on gasoline. I fly for work when necessary and occasionally for vacation. But doing these things is not the same as admitting they are inevitable. Five years ago I flew more; now I use Skype. Bike lanes have been newly painted in my neighborhood, so I cycle to the store. In a couple of years, electric cars might come into my price range. In the meantime, I refuse to feel guilty.

In the battle against climate change, we should not be waging guilt trips on one another. Rather, we should take the fight to those who use our sense of personal responsibility against us. Climate change is a problem, and we must fix it. But it’s certainly not our fault.

See? It’s that easy, Warmists. It’s Someone Else’s fault, so, buck up little campers, don’t feel guilty…do any actually feel guilty? I’ve yet to run across any Warmist who feels guilty about being a climahypocrite. They also seem to have lots of excuses handy as to why they barely take even token measures within their own lives. Anyhow, I really find amusement in the notion that Warmists are supposed to fight back against those who attempt to make them feel guilty, because that’s apparently more important than practicing what they preach.

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6 Responses to “Greenpeace Warmist: Hey, All You Warmists Shouldn’t Feel Guilty About Being Complete Hypocrites”

  1. hockeydad says:

    Here is the main problem…

    We feel guilty about driving cars and watching TV and turning on lights, as if that makes us personally responsible for this gigantic threat that looms over us.

    If they don’t believe that using these items makes the responsible for the threat then why should anyone else? You lead by example and for them to continue to use these fossil burning items, they are in effect not only responsible but encouraging others to follow their lead. I’ve repeatedly asked my children why should we change our life and not do the things we like when those asking us to change continue to live as they please. Don’t talk to me about shared sacrifice when you are unwilling to change first. Lead, show us the way….if all of the “Warmers” did as they preached the rest of us may not have to do anything and the planet will be saved. If after all of them change and there is still a problem I’m willing to review the data and if required make changes to my lifestyle. Until then I will “move forward” with the life I enjoy.

  2. Excellent points, hockeydad. Warmists have no concern with their own behavior, just the behavior of That Guy or That Group. Much like with taxation: they want taxes to go up and That Guy, but not themselves. They want That Guy to pay his fair share, but not themselves.

  3. Gumballs_Brains says:

    We feel guilty about driving cars and watching TV and turning on lights, as if that makes us personally responsible for this gigantic threat that looms over us.

    Ummm… Yeah, it kinda does you idiot!!! If you are going to blame the Realists for living the exact same way, then, yeah, see those other 3 fingers pointing back at yourself. Idiot.

    Whether this “guilt barrier” is deliberately constructed or just innate to our psyches, it’s being exploited by the fossil fuel cartel.

    Let’s see you live any kind or semblance of a normal life without any form of petro-chemical. Try it. Then go out and try and develop all those neat little gadgets, doodads, plastics, makeup, hair gel, medicine, and your food. See if you can do it without creating some form of “corporation” indebting themselves in research, development, and expenditures so that you punk-ass idiots can have your comfy-no-guilt guilt.

    we’re all happily choosing fossil fuels. That’s simply not true, and nowhere is this more evident than in the case of the oil industry’s greatest threat: the electric car. Despite encouraging news that the Toyota Prius has become the No. 1 selling car in California, fully electric vehicles remain out of financial reach for all but the most affluent families.

    Ummm…. there is absolutely NOW WAY that a small, overpriced, mobile battery that is only affordable to the upper 5%, and has sold only few hundred thousand (if that) across all models in USA, will ever compete with the vast global scale of oil transactions. Can you say, “spitting in the ocean”?

    And, is that statistic true? I’ve not been able to find the data for it. I see hype after hype. I see that the top 14 markets are all liberal bastions, where the buying is mostly city and state sales. Could it also be related to the $5 gallon gas due to the high fees and taxes?

    Oh.. found it. So, the Prius sales data shows selling 15,661 Prius’ in California. That is said to be the BEST selling new car. Toyota sold a total of 292,024, outselling all other brands, yet only 15,661 of that is Prius?

    How many models do they have to bump that sales from 15,661 up to 292,024?!?
    292,000 minus 16,000 (to make it simple) = 276,000 other cars sold. Let’s assume an average of 10,000 units sold per other Toyota models. (it has to be less than 15,661)
    276,000 divided by 10,000 = 27 OTHER models of Toyota were sold in California. Does Toyota have a total of 28 model vehicles for sale? Well, the “all vehicles” list shows 23. that’s pretty darn close. Oh oh. They double count. How many models do they really sell? Let’s count.
    1-Yaris
    2-Corolla – 14188
    3-Tacoma – 6756
    4-Prius – 15661
    5-Matrix
    6-Camry – 12991
    7-Rav4 – 4757
    8-Tundra – 2647
    9-Sienna – 4674
    10-FJ Cruiser
    11-Venza
    12-Highlander – 3443
    13-Avalon – 1511
    14-4Runner
    15-Sequoia
    16-Land Cruiser

    Well, what do ya know. The numbers don’t add up. ok, as you can see, I was a little bored. I added the sales numbers from the PDF to my list. Those that are not listed were not deemed of significant sales (in the pdf) to be in top 5 of their categories, meaning, their sales were less than 10% of that size’s market share. Some, sold less than 5% of share. yes, Yaris sold less than the Chevy Sonic. (Nope, I’ve not heard of it either.)

    So, let’s add up all those other sales figures shall we? I’ll be generous and say, 51,000 sales of the most popular line of Toyota vehicles. Add in the most popular car, that number jumps all the way up to …. 66,700. hmmmmm… certainly sounds far less than the 292,024 it is said to have sold. hmmmmm.

    Are they trying to have me believe that nearly 230,000 yaris (yari ?) were sold in California in 2012? But then, wouldn’t that make the yaris the most sold car in CA in 2012?

    And, I’ll stop there. I’ve think I’ve done enough damage for today. (bows)

  4. Whew!!!! An incredible amount of good info, GB.

    Waiting for John to reply “but, Bush!!!!”

    What’s sad is that under the Obameconomy the little Yaris is their #1 seller.

  5. Gumballs_Brains says:

    Sorry, that article got on my last straw\nerve. It was so full of BULLHOCKIES that I just had to nuke it with extreme prejudice. And I only had to go 2 paragraphs. I was at work and didn’t want to scare my co-workers.

  6. I understand. The Warmists are exasperating with their utter idiocy and hypocrisy. Yet they will preach to us about Doing Something.

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