Slate Spins Wheel And Decides That Deodorant Is Now Part Of The Patriarchy

There are some days I think that Trump should start a big war with Iran, because it would mean that the nutters would stop inventing things to whine about. The thing about Peak Wokeness is that you never get there: the virtue signaling barking moonbats will always be able to find some minor, tiny thing and turn it into a mountain

From the “article“, which is nominally about the rise of natural deodorants, but, goes all woke

The answer is a little bit of both. We don’t need aluminum-free deodorant, but the social implications of products that allow women to sweat are good anyway. Deodorants were first sold in the late 1800s, with antiperspirants following shortly thereafter. But it took a bit of time for the concept of masking and/or stopping sweat to take off. Early marketing campaigns, as journalist Sarah Everts has reported, were designed to make women—and they were first marketed just to women—embarrassed about the entire concept of perspiration. A few years ago, Everts dug up sponsored newspaper stories from an early antiperspirant company called Odorono (that expands to: odor-o-no). They had titles like “The most humiliating moment in my life: When I overheard the cause of my unpopularity among men” (spoiler: it was sweat) and “If you long for romance don’t let your dress offend with ‘armhole odor.’ ”

Nowadays, it’s practically expected that women aren’t supposed to sweat through their armpits, which is why I’ve been using antiperspirants since I was in middle school. Using Clean Queen would be something of a sweating experiment for me, and one I was embarking on during the beginning of a new relationship. He’s a nice guy, but thanks to a literal century of the kinds of ads in the vein of the above, it felt fundamentally unwise. So, I planned my outfits carefully to not show pit stains: a tank top paired with a billowy cover-up, a jumpsuit in a dark color.

Sorry, chickie Shannon Palus, men aren’t expected to sweat through their non-workout clothes, either. And, yes, controlling odor. I use it every day even though I’m not much of a pit sweater, nor do I get stinky (more of a head and foot sweater). Some people need to use it more than others.

So, me and my luxury deodorant are not exactly bucking the patriarchy. Either way, our week together was a little slimy, but overall it exceeded my expectations. I’ve been using antiperspirants for so many years that I was surprised at how little I sweated, and I quickly stopped worrying so much about if my clothing would hide it. Plus, the Clean Queen kept my pits smelling like baking soda, though I’m now curious if I’d even smell that bad with nothing. The best part: I texted the new boyfriend, whom I had spent a significant chunk of my experiment hanging out with, to ask if he had even noticed the switch. A firm “nope.”

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10 Responses to “Slate Spins Wheel And Decides That Deodorant Is Now Part Of The Patriarchy”

  1. Professor Hale says:

    It’s my understanding that Stink does not come from sweat. It comes from lack of bathing. But if she thinks this is about the patriarchy, she should try traveling to Asia, Africa, and half of Europe where deodorant and soap haven’t really caught on yet. In Bosnia, I could smell the odor from the Russian tent 100 yards away.

  2. Kye says:

    When I was sniping my little Yankee butt off in Nam I could smell a gook 25 yards away. Their sweat smelled like pho mixed with crap.

  3. david7134 says:

    I read somewhere that a western man went to Ukraine and visited a friends home. On the mantel they had a bottle of western deodorant. Asked why it was there, the Ukraine responded that it was the most ridiculous thing they had seen. But I still like for people to use the product as it makes life easier, besides, it is aluminum and if you nick yourself shaving, that will stopped the bleeding.

    Side note, I saw an advertisement for ball deodorant, that is a bit much.

  4. Dana says:

    Slate’s new spokeswench!

  5. Elwood P. Dowd says:

    “Oh, the Stupidity!”

    A TEACH post on deodorants…

    The Slate article did actually offer some valuable information – anti-perspirants do not cause cancer.

    The internets are filled with stupid BS, so anytime a meme can be debunked, we’re better off, and the Slate article was informative and well-written.

    The Covians use it as a dog-whistle to let fly at women, “gooks”, and other foreigners. Typical.

    • formwiz says:

      “Oh, the Stupidity!”

      A TEACH post on deodorants…

      No, a rebuttal to Slate.

      The Slate article did actually offer some valuable information – anti-perspirants do not cause cancer.

      Actually, the rebuttals are a little fuzzy, not strictly saying, “No”. They can cause dimentia and maybe some gut problems.

      Rule Of Thumb

      If Jeffery is for it, be against it. Deodorant will do the same job and a little sweat never hurt anybody.

      The internets are filled with stupid BS

      Global nonsense being at the top of the list.

      anytime a meme can be debunked, we’re better off, and the Slate article was informative and well-written.

      Early marketing campaigns, as journalist Sarah Everts has reported, were designed to make women—and they were first marketed just to women—embarrassed about the entire concept of perspiration. A few years ago, Everts dug up sponsored newspaper stories from an early antiperspirant company called Odorono (that expands to: odor-o-no). They had titles like “The most humiliating moment in my life: When I overheard the cause of my unpopularity among men” (spoiler: it was sweat) and “If you long for romance don’t let your dress offend with ‘armhole odor.’

      So, me and my luxury deodorant are not exactly bucking the patriarchy. Either way, our week together was a little slimy, but overall it exceeded my expectations.

      If he thinks that’s good writing, he clearly never got past Dick and Jane.

      The Covians use it as a dog-whistle to let fly at women, “gooks”, and other foreigners. Typical.

      Women are foreigners? Snooze to me. And we love the Asians. They work hard, make their kids mind, are pillars of the community, and are law-abiding.

      Sounds like some guy’s walking around in his Freudian Slip again.

      And that “Typical”. Sounds like another Negro racist. This guy used it against the white grandmother who raised him after his “mother” went off to pursue an education in advanced basketweaving.

  6. Elwood P. Dowd says:

    Sounds like E. S. Dutcher never learns.

    Rule of Thumb: If Edward criticizes it, you should be for it.

    And the word is “dementia”. You should get used to hearing it.

    Kye was talking about killing smelly gooks. The “Perfessor” was talking about smelly Russians. davy was talking about smelly Ukrainians.

    And TEACH called her a “chickie” and invented the whole “patriarchal” angle from a tweet, not from the article.

    • formwiz says:

      Kye was telling the truth. Americans and VC could easily smell where the other had been.

      His culinary ignorance is showing.

      david was merely relating an article he read (I’d bring up reading comprehension, but that’s a Lefty dodge) and Prof merely relating that the Russkies in Bosnia didn’t wash.

      Were you, with your vast military experience, in Bosnia? (actually, a lot of cultures don’t wash; the Frawgs are notorious for it)

      If Edward criticizes it, you should be for it.

      You’ll have to take that up with Teach, but you’re right about nothing.

      And, yes, dementia does seem to be a result of exposure to aluminum. whether it causes cancer, the people rebutting it don’t give much clinical evidence to back them up.

      Rule Of Thumb persists.

      If Jeffery’s for it, be against it.

      And TEACH called her a “chickie” and invented the whole “patriarchal” angle from a tweet, not from the article.

      So, me and my luxury deodorant are not exactly bucking the patriarchy.

      Early marketing campaigns, as journalist Sarah Everts has reported, were designed to make women—and they were first marketed just to women—embarrassed about the entire concept of perspiration. A few years ago, Everts dug up sponsored newspaper stories from an early antiperspirant company called Odorono (that expands to: odor-o-no). They had titles like “The most humiliating moment in my life: When I overheard the cause of my unpopularity among men” (spoiler: it was sweat) and “If you long for romance don’t let your dress offend with ‘armhole odor.’ ”

      He never reads. He never thinks.

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