People Who Should Have Known Better Whine About Forgetting Their ID To Vote

I’m wondering, how does someone attend a major university without a state issued ID?

Voters without photo ID run into new election rules

Lisa Guraya wasn’t surprised earlier this month when poll workers at an early voting site near Duke University told her she didn’t have the right kind of photo identification, but the sophomore knew she should be allowed to vote anyway.

She is one of at least 864 voters across the North Carolina who came out to vote early in person but did not have an acceptable ID with them during the first election they have been required in the state.

More than half of those who lacked ID just forgot their documents and will be able to bring an ID card to their local board of elections office. But Guraya is among the 378 who, as of Saturday afternoon, said they do not have a North Carolina driver’s license, U.S. passport or other acceptable identity document.

Well, it might be the case because she seems to be a resident of Alabama, not North Carolina. WRAL is rather cagey about the whole thing, and either forgot to do that whole journalism thing or is intentionally not letting the readers know.

In Guraya’s case, she had only her Alabama driver’s license. Under new voting rules, she was able to claim a “reasonable impediment” to having the correct ID, but she said the process wasn’t smooth.

Just because one attends school in North Carolina doesn’t give them the right to vote in NC elections. When I attended ECU, I was a New Jersey resident till 1990, hence, I sent in absentee ballots.

“The person who I asked wasn’t even sure at first how to do a reasonable impediment ballot,” recalled Guraya, who has more reason than most undergraduates to be well versed on voter ID laws. She’s from Shelby County, Ala., from whence the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case Shelby County v. Holder originated. That decision helped pave the way for voter ID laws like North Carolina’s.

“It just made me not completely sure my vote was going to go through,” she said.

Well, if she’s not an NC resident, then she should understand she cannot vote here.

Guraya said that, during her trip home this summer, she will be able to retrieve her passport in order to vote in the November general election. Down the road in Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina sophomore Isatta Feika says she likely won’t vote in North Carolina again after experiencing the hassles involving voting with an ID in North Carolina.

Why not vote in Alabama? Or, is she trying to do both? Another option would have been to change her state residency from Alabama to NC, which she should have known to do long ago. Nor does the article explain where Isatta Feika is from.

As for the roughly half who forgot their ID, let me know how that works when you try and take an airplane flight, take a tour of the White House, etc.

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11 Responses to “People Who Should Have Known Better Whine About Forgetting Their ID To Vote”

  1. Dana says:

    Our esteemed host wrote:

    Well, if she’s not an NC resident, then she should understand she cannot vote here.

    I’m afraid that you got that wrong: if she has lived in Carolina for thirty days, then she can register to vote there, even if her address is a dorm room. That’s federal law.

    Look at it this way: if she has a part-time job, she’d be paying taxes in Carolina.

  2. John says:

    NC should stop gerrymandering
    Please stop voting into office people who do that
    The Federal Court said your 12th district was the most extreme gerrymandering in the entire country
    Because of gerrymandering the Dems were only able to send 3 reps it if 13 to the US House even though state wide they received 44% of the vote
    They should have gotten twice as many they were cheated by gerrymandering

  3. Hoss says:

    Gerrymandering was only good when the left was in control of the gerrymandering.

  4. JGlanton says:

    I had to show ID to taste wine at a winery yesterday. I whined a little, but only because I am middle-aged.

  5. gitarcarver says:

    Gerrymandering was only good when the left was in control of the gerrymandering.

    Look at Maryland, for example.

    The odd thing about john’s continued rant on the districts in North Carolina is how those districts came about. They were the result of the Federal law (struck down by the Supreme Court in 2014) on districts being approved by the Department of Justice.

    North Carolina drew districts that were met with the approval of the DOJ. Those districts were challenged in court.

    The second odd thing is notice how john says that because blacks make up 44% of the voting population in North Carolina, the state representatives should reflect that percentage.

    john is wrong on the numbers right off the bat. The percentage he cites is the blacks of voting age percentage (BVAP) in the two districts that were the basis of the lawsuit – District 1 and 12. (Actual percentage of blacks in North Carolina is roughly 22% according to the US Census.)

    Notice also how john believes that blacks will only vote for other blacks. That is a racist statement if ever there was one. Apparently john the liberal thinks that blacks only look at the color of someone’s skin as the deciding factor as to whether to vote for them or not. If a white person said “I am only going to vote for a white person,” they would be labeled a racist (probably rightfully so.) Yet in john’s little world, blacks only voting for other blacks is predictable and the right thing to do.

    Why is it that liberals are the most racist people in the country, and yet complain about other people being racist? Projection?

    In North Carolina, the districts were drawn in accordance with the law at the time and with the DOJ approval. Race was a deciding factor in how the districts were drawn in order to make sure the BVAP did not drop below a 44% threshold in those districts.

    The legislature did what the DOJ wanted and got slammed for it.

  6. gitarcarver says:

    If you got to taste the samples, you probably “wined” a lot. 😉

  7. Jeffery says:

    The goal of the restrictive voting laws is to reduce the number of student, senior and minority voters. Mission Accomplished!

    The facts are clear. The laws dissuade many more legitimate voters than catch nonexistent fraudulent voters.

  8. I’m afraid that you got that wrong: if she has lived in Carolina for thirty days, then she can register to vote there, even if her address is a dorm room. That’s federal law.

    True, but she would have had to declare residency and get a NCDL or NC state ID.

    NC should stop gerrymandering
    Please stop voting into office people who do that

    Yeah, that would be pretty much every elected official of all parties. Let’s go for anarchy!

    I had to show ID to taste wine at a winery yesterday. I whined a little, but only because I am middle-aged.

    What sucks is when you no longer get carded when buying alcohol. That’s when you know you’re old.

    john is wrong on the numbers right off the bat.

    Wait, you were expecting something different? He probably looked at the quick info from the census and added the 2014 and 2010 data together. Because reading is difficult for him.

    The goal of the restrictive voting laws is to reduce the number of student, senior and minority voters.

    So, does that mean that requiring ID to fly, drive, open a bank account, apply for food stamps, apply for welfare, apply for a job, rent or buy a domicile, pick up a prescription, rent a hotel room, and enter a Hillary or Obama campaign event is evil?

  9. gitarcarver says:

    The goal of the restrictive voting laws is to reduce the number of student, senior and minority voters.

    The goal is to make sure votes are legally cast.

    This case is a good one. What is preventing the woman from voting in North Carolina and Alabama where she is from?

    It is always interesting to see that liberals are against anything that protects the legal votes of people.

    The laws dissuade many more legitimate voters than catch nonexistent fraudulent voters.

    There you have it.

    Jeffery thinks it is acceptable to have fraudulent voters.

  10. Dana says:

    Our esteemed host asked:

    This case is a good one. What is preventing the woman from voting in North Carolina and Alabama where she is from?

    That depends: does the Tarheel State have a voter registration mechanism which automatically notifies other states that one of their former residents registered to vote in Carolina?

    Realistically, we would need a completely computerized, federally-overseen voter registration system which tracked registered voters by their Social Security numbers to get that done. Conservatives, including me, have long resisted the notion of a national identification card — it’s too much like “Ve need to see your papers” for us — but, in our modern society, we may have to adopt one. It would be very useful in preventing vote fraud, so now the Democrats won’t like it, either.

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