New Jersey Looks To Make Their Gun Laws Even Tougher

This should have the criminals totally shaking in their boots. But, there is one somewhat good thing

N.J.’s already tough gun laws could soon become even more strict

New Jersey’s already tough gun laws are on the way to becoming even more strict.

A state Assembly panel on Thursday approved eight new gun control bills, including a controversial measure on smart guns — handguns that can only be fired by their designated owners. Other proposals would require all handgun ammunition sales to be recorded and compel many people with firearms in the state to undergo regular safety training in the Garden State.

The bills cleared the Assembly Judiciary Committee with Democrats voting yes and Republicans voting no.

“These new bills will ensure that law enforcement, state entities, and gun store owners will work together to reduce gun crimes and gun trafficking in our communities,” said Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, D-Camden.

The smart gun bill (A1016) would require Garden State retailers to have personalized handguns on their shelves for sales.

New Jersey first tried to require this in 2002. But Democrats, who lead the Legislature, say that law — which requires that only personalized handguns be offered for sale in New Jersey three years after they’re on the market in the U.S. — actually stifled the development and delayed the sale of so-called childproof handguns.

They want to repeal the law and replace it with one that would require every retailer offer at least one personalized handgun model for sale. This, they hope, will shake loose the research and development they say was stymied by gun rights advocates who didn’t want to start New Jersey’s three-year clock.

“If you want to see smart guns develop, keep your hands off of them and let the markets develop,” Scott Bach, executive director of the Association of New Jersey Rifle and Pistol Clubs, said at Thursday’s hearing as he urged lawmakers to vote against the bill, along with several others.

Look, I know a lot of gun owners are against so-called smart guns, but, a lot of that has to do with the NJ law. Think about it: if you could have a firearm that only you could fire (and designated people, if necessary) and it was reliable: would you want it? It would make theft of firearms almost impossible. It would mean that bad players would have a really, really tough time getting firearms illegally. And harder to use them. And, it would limit a lot of the gun grabber’s power.

Of course, a lot of what NJ is doing is making it harder for law abiding citizens, rather than criminals with things like

Require places that sell handgun ammunition to track their ammunition sales and report them to the State Police (A5455). They would also be required to make sure people purchasing handgun ammunition are 21 years old, which is the legal age for buying a handgun.

Heck, if I lived there I’d just drive to Pennsylvania or Delaware. California is looking to do the same thing.

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11 Responses to “New Jersey Looks To Make Their Gun Laws Even Tougher”

  1. Bkhuna says:

    Until Ruger pulls out of NJ, nobody should buy their products. Why give money to a company that helps to fund an anti-second amendment stat government.

    • Elwood P. Dowd says:

      Bkhuna typed: “Until Ruger pulls out of NJ…”

      Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc., better known by the shortened name Ruger, is an American firearm manufacturing company based in Southport, Connecticut with production facilities also in Newport, New Hampshire; Mayodan, North Carolina and Prescott, Arizona.

      You may not realize this but companies whose business is to sell things typically do better when they sell things. Even if they have to sell in NJ. Like most gun sellers they have seen lagging sales since tRump was elected.

      Did you know that firearms manufacturers are suffering under tRump? Seems like gun nutz have all the guns they need these days. In fact, Remington has filed Chapter 11. (I have 3 Remington shotguns and 3 Remington Model 700s).

      ‘Gun giant Smith & Wesson, which has renamed itself American Outdoor Brands, said that its quarterly net sales had declined nearly 40%…’

      http://fortune.com/2017/09/11/trump-gun-sales-decline/

      • formwiz says:

        most gun sellers they have seen lagging sales since tRump was elected.

        Glut on the market, sweetie.

        Zippy sold a lot of firearms while he played being Preezy. Now that Trump is in and the country is safe, no so urgent a need.

  2. CT Ginger says:

    If smart guns are based on any kind of RFID, it would not be impossible for an entity, governmental or otherwise to broadcast a wave to block the signal or otherwise interfer with the signal rendering all of them inoperable

  3. Elwood P. Dowd says:

    Most state firearms restrictions do little good. It’s not as NJ has their own border patrol searching cars from PA, NY and DE. As TEACH explains, one can drive to the next state over.

    Remember, to a large extent, gun manufacturers (and the NRA) aren’t in business to make America safe or prevent crime, their objective is to sell products and make money for their shareholders. It’s up to us to be safe and to enact any laws and policies governing potentially dangerous goods.

    There are some 30,000 deaths from firearms each year in the US – 10,000 homicides, 20,000 suicides, fewer than 1000 accidental shootings. More people die from drug overdoses, tobacco use, either lung/prostate/breast/colon cancer, influenza/pneumonia, diabetes, other accidents… over 2.5 million Americans die each year.

    But the idea of someone walking into a school and murdering a dozen children, shooting hundreds of concert goers, shooting up churches, synagogues, theaters, mosques and shopping malls is beyond the pale. Will it ever stop? Don’t know. But that’s what upsets people the most. If we did nothing as a society after Adam Lanza slaughtered dozens of grade school kids, it’s likely the problem can’t be solved.

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