Should You Fake Christmas This Year, Cause “Climate Change”?

By fake it, Lesley Allen at Drayton Valley Western Review is referring to Christmas trees, er, holiday trees, er, winter festival trees. Let’s continue with the 25 days of Climate Christmas

Should you fake it this Christmas

Oh Christmas tree, oh Christmas tree, which should I buy environmentally?

With the Christmas season upon us a great debate among those who celebrate the holiday has begun­ — should we buy a real or fake tree?

There are many reasons why one chooses to go in either direction, but the one I find people get most confused about is how each of the options affects the environment, and which one is truly greener.

So, which should you purchase, real or fake?

According to Ellipsos, a research company based out of South Carolina, an artificial tree has three times more impact on climate change and resource depletion than the natural tree, based on a six-year retention of the fake tree. However, if you are to keep the same fake tree for at least 20 years the opposite becomes true, especially if longer distances of transportation are required in order to access the real trees.

The reasons for a real tree being more environmentally-friendly include the fact that they are easily recycled and can be reused, they pull carbon from the air to help grow, and because of the environmental footprint it takes to make fake trees.

Regardless of the fact and which direction you decide to go there are ways you can help reduce your footprint:

Lesley then provides super helpful hints to make your decision to purchase a Winter Is Going to Be Super Hot In The Future And We’re All Doomed Tree that much more difficult. Because Christmas, er, the name liberals often hate to mention but still want their paid day off for, should be about climate change or something.

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6 Responses to “Should You Fake Christmas This Year, Cause “Climate Change”?”

  1. david7134 says:

    One year, I decided to take our old tree out in the backyard and see just how flammable it was. It had been well watered and taken care of. I struck a match and threw it at the tree. Before the match hit a branch the tree erupted into a massive fireball and the fire reached to about 30 feet. The fire was hotter than any gasoline I have ever used. I now use artificial trees.

  2. I’ve had the same 3 foot artificial tree for about 9 years, so I’m close to “carbon neutral” or something.

  3. jl says:

    Their “fake Christmas” goes along well with their fake global warming.

  4. Gumballs_Of_Winter says:

    Oh dang. I’m embarrassed. I thought this was a sexual reference.

  5. Blick says:

    I cover both bases and have a real tree and an artificial tree. One in the house and one outside. Would not want to offend either side of the debate. In celebration I will have an evil CO2 infused beer or soda or something alcoholic.

  6. Trish Mac says:

    david, our friends once had a big bonfire and before lighting it they threw their dried out Christmas tree on top of. When he lit it, the thing sent flames about 50 feet or more into the air, catching overhanging branches of a huge tree in the yard next door on fire. I think it was visible from the space station… And even though he’d cleared his bonfire with the local fire dept, they showed up en masse, due to a bunch of calls from concerned neighbors! By the time they arrived, the fire had died down to a calmer level and they let it go. Was a riot though…
    However, this tree had been in his backyard for months and was dry as could be. I think your tree was volatile because of the oils in the pine needles!

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