ACLU Has Hissy Fit Over Ceremony Honoring Police At High School Football Game

You’ll be amazed at what the ACLU called the ceremony. Though probably not shocked, because this is the kind of thing the ACLU does

Ceremony honoring police before HS game sends ‘frightening message,’ ACLU says

A ceremony honoring law enforcement, military and first responders before a high school football game Friday night drew criticism from the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey because of an underlying “frightening message.”

The ceremony was held before a highly-anticipated Shore Conference clash between two topped ranked teams in the state, Middletown South and Toms River North.

The ceremony, organized by Middletown police Deputy Chief Stephen Dollinger, featured State Police Pipes and Drums of the Blue and Gold, state and local mounted units, military personnel from all branches of service and officers from surrounding police departments and sheriff’s units.

It also honored the Linden police officer who was wounded in a shootout withAhmad Khan Rahimi, who is accused of bombings in Seaside Park, Elizabeth and New York City.

And here’s where the ACLU had a fit

Dollinger told the Asbury Park Press before the event that the ceremony was also meant to respond to pro athletes who have taken a knee during pre-game performances of the national anthem, most notably by San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

“It’s OK to stand up for social justice, inequality and reform,” Dollinger told the newspaper. “It’s another thing to not stand up for the national anthem.”

The ACLU of NJ really didn’t like that anyone would dare use their 1st Amendment Rights to respond to others engaging in their 1st Amendment Rights

“As initially described, the event appeared to honor police officers, veterans, service members, and first responders,” the ACLU wrote to the district. “According to press reports, however, the event is being used to intimidate and ostracizepeople who express their views about systemic racism and social just.”

“Law enforcement officers are sworn to protect the constitution, and it is a disservice to the students and players that an event that should focus on them, their families, and their communities is being used to send a message that people who express concerns about disparities in the criminal justice system are unwelcome, disloyal or unpatriotic,” the letter states.

Jasmine Crenshaw, an organizer with the ACLU-NJ, said the event sends a “frightening message” that law enforcement will not tolerate people expressing their views on the nation’s “history of unequal treatment and systematic oppression.”

“Entrance to one of the biggest sporting events in the area should not require that someone accept an atmosphere that suppresses political protest,” Crenshaw said in a statement. “The magnitude of this event chills the belief that police should be held accountable when they abuse their power or discriminate against people of color, and pressures student athletes to act as props of the police.”

Free speech for me, but not for thee. It’s simply typical of people nowadays to turn the amplifier up to 11 on everything, and overly magnify everything.

Really, though, can we simply watch sports without political messages? Personally, I don’t want to see them either way. Just let me watch a game.

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8 Responses to “ACLU Has Hissy Fit Over Ceremony Honoring Police At High School Football Game”

  1. Jeffery says:

    Why would you call the ACLU objections a “hissy fit”?

    Anyway, the question is simply, should the government be sponsoring counterprotests?

    How in the world is this demonstration of government power a 1st Amendment issue?

  2. Dana says:

    Our esteemed host wrote:

    The ACLU of NJ really didn’t like that anyone would dare use their 1st Amendment Rights to respond to others engaging in their 1st Amendment Rights

    I’ve said it many times before: the left are pro-choice on exactly one thing.

  3. Jeffery says:

    The “others engaging in the their 1st Amendment Rights” in this case is a government entity refuting the protests of private citizens.

    Is this really the road we wish to go down?

  4. Dana says:

    Are you saying that the government ought not have the right to “refut(e) the protests of private citizens”?

    And yes, this is a trap.

  5. john says:

    You probably would have wished Muhammad Ali to remain Cassius Clay and not publicly opposed the VietNam War. You would be happier if athletes, especially Black athletes remained politically speechless and simply performed and entertained you.

  6. Rev.Hoagie® says:

    You probably would have wished Muhammad Ali to remain Cassius Clay and not publicly opposed the VietNam War.

    Unlike you john, I don’t presume to know what Dana “would have wished”. I personally don’t care if Cassius Clay changed his name to Joe Shit, makes no difference to me. Having fought in Vietnam and having met, known and loved many great Vietnamese people, I think his opposition was ill informed, cowardly and un American. Since he, and most of the protesters of the day, was never in Vietnam he had no personal insight a to how hard these lovey people just wanted to be free from the yoke of communism and left alone to take care of their own families. Muhammad Ali, being a moslem would be against whatever US policy was/is since they view us as enemies. In WWII they were Nazi allies, today they are communist allies. All leftists, all atheist’s, nothing’s changed.

    You would be happier if athletes, especially Black athletes remained politically speechless and simply performed and entertained you.

    Again, unlike you john, I don’t know what would make Dana “happier” but I sincerely doubt his happiness depends on the actions of black athletes. Speaking for myself I would prefer if all athletes would play the phuckin’ game and stop with the politics. People pay money to see a game not watch the players protest and voice their political positions. They have all day every day but game day to do their little cheeky protests. BTW, what are they protesting, again?

  7. Dana says:

    John gets stupid:

    You probably would have wished Muhammad Ali to remain Cassius Clay and not publicly opposed the VietNam War. You would be happier if athletes, especially Black athletes remained politically speechless and simply performed and entertained you.

    Well, there is some karmic justice in Colin Kaepernick getting to start for the 49ers, and stinking just as badly as Blaine Gabbard. The most expensive backup quarterback in history.

    Freedom of speech, of course, is guaranteed for all. What is not guaranteed is that others respect what you say, listen to what you say, or buy the product you sell.

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