Beautiful Purple Flowers Bloom In Kentucky, Which Means ‘Climate Change’ Doom

If you saw a bunch of lovely purple blooms across the landscape, what would you think? The majesty of nature? Maybe pull out the smartphone for a picture of an awesome landscape? If you’re a Warmist, your first thought is that people should be taxed to stop this

Purple Blooms Across Kentucky Fields Likely a Sign of Climate Change

Purple flowers across many fields in Kentucky and Indiana are more than flowering weeds. An agriculture extension agent says those purple blooms are a sign of climate change and the increasingly unpredictable weather that farmers have to deal with.

Jon Neufelder is an educator with the Purdue University Extension Office in Posey County, Indiana. He said the flowers are purple deadnettle and henbit and they’re a sign of a warm winter and an early spring.

That’s never ever happened before, you guys. And doom!

“I think the research and the science is real, that there is climate change and we’re experiencing it with these extremes in weather. I thinks the facts are that we’re getting earlier and earlier in our planting season and our growing season is expanding. We’ve got a longer window from spring ’til even late in the fall. Crops don’t get frozen out nearly as early they used to 20 or 30 years ago.”

Two points: First, the climate always changes, and is a longer growing season a bad thing? Second, this doesn’t prove causation. And that’s the argument.

Oh, and that Warmists just can’t enjoy nature without thinking their politics.

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2 Responses to “Beautiful Purple Flowers Bloom In Kentucky, Which Means ‘Climate Change’ Doom”

  1. Dana says:

    Our host quoted:

    An agriculture extension agent says those purple blooms are a sign of climate change and the increasingly unpredictable weather that farmers have to deal with.

    Jon Neufelder is an educator with the Purdue University Extension Office in Posey County, Indiana. He said the flowers are purple deadnettle and henbit and they’re a sign of a warm winter and an early spring.

    As it happens, Facebook notified me of my photos from this day last year, in which the weeping cherry tree has started to blossom. This year? Well, it’s starting to bud, but there’s nary a blossom on it yet.

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