NY Times Is Very Concerned About Fossil Fueled Airports Flooding Or Something

One typhoon, a natural even that has happened before Mankind started using fossil fuels, is now proof of doom

From the Cult of Climastrology screed

As a powerful typhoon tore through Japan this week, travelers at Kansai International Airport looked out on a terrifying void: Where they should have seen the runway, they saw only the sea.

They also saw what could be a perilous future for low-lying airports around the world, increasingly vulnerable to the rising sea levels and more extreme storms brought about by climate change. A quarter of the world’s 100 busiest airports are less than 10 meters, or 32 feet, above sea level, according to an analysis of data from Airports Council Internationaland OpenFlights.

Twelve of those airports — including hubs in Shanghai, Rome, San Francisco and New York — are less than 5 meters above sea level. (snip)

The threat from rising waters comes as a reckoning for an industry that ranks among the major contributors to climate change. Air travel accounts for about 3 percent of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide, but is one of the fastest-growing emissions sources. Given current trends, emissions from international air travel will triple by 2050, the International Civil Aviation Organization has predicted.

As the aviation industry grapples with its carbon footprint, it has also started to feel the effects of global warming. Extreme heat can ground planes because hotter, thinner air makes achieving lift difficult. A changing climate can also increase turbulence.

Low-lying areas along the water have long been seen as ideal sites for building new runways and terminals, because there are fewer obstacles for the planes during takeoff and landing, and less potential for noise complaints. But coasts also provide few natural protections against flooding or high winds.

All told, extreme weather and rising sea levels today pose one of the most urgent threats to many of the world’s busiest airports, which often weren’t designed with global warming in mind.

The sea rose a whopping eight inches during the 20th Century. It won’t be going up 32 feet any time soon. But, this is all based on a typhoon happening, something which always has happened. A slight increase in carbon dioxide has little to no effect on this.

The Kushimoto station shows 1.26ft per century, and it only goes back to 1960. Many of the stations are similar. Some, are much lower. Some are negative. It’s just nature in motion.

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One Response to “NY Times Is Very Concerned About Fossil Fueled Airports Flooding Or Something”

  1. JGlanton says:

    travelers at Kansai International Airport looked out on a terrifying void: Where they should have seen the runway, they saw only the sea.

    https://www.thepiratescove.us/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/wpml_negative.gif

    These newspaper climate and environment writers so often write like Stephen King – style horror novelists. This article reads more like a scene from The Langoliers than it does informative science.

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